Herbaceous & Bulbous

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Displaying 1 to 5 of 5 results, sorted alphabetically.
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Impatiens pritzelii 'Sichuan Gold' (new)

A Darrel Probst collection from China, this exceptionally hardy species is best suited to some shade and not too overly dry soil. The large flowers, see June to October are cream and soft yellow with darker orange-brown markings in the throat. Height 45cm.

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Incarvillea olgae (new)

Penstemon-like pink trumpet flowers over a very long succession in summer and autumn, carried atop many upright slender stems to about 1m tall; the stems clothed in short pretty pinnate foliage composed of narrow, sometimes dissected leaflets. Extremely hardy and drought tolerant. A form of this long lived woody based perennial found in Tajikistan, C. Asia.

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Ipheion 'Alberto Castillo'

Ipheion 'Alberto Castillo'

Large, glistening white flowers in late spring. Grey leaves. Height 10cm. Sun and drainage.

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Iris chrysographes 'Black Knight'

Iris chrysographes 'Black Knight'

Elegant black-purple flowers to 45cm high in early summer over narrow, bright green foliage. Sun. A native of S. China and Burma.

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Iris foetidissima var. citrina

An extremely tough evergreen species, native to the UK and suitable for very dry shade and of course less testing sites also. In this form the summer flowers are pale yellow with soft purple markings and show up much better than the more normal dingy purple form. Seed pods open to show striking bright orange seeds in autumn, which last into winter. Height 60cm. Sun or shade.

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Displaying 1 to 5 of 5 results, sorted alphabetically.
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