Herbaceous & Bulbous

All A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P R S T V W X Z
Displaying 1 to 10 of 10 results, sorted alphabetically.
Click on any thumbnails to see a larger picture:

Macleaya cordata NJM 11.002 (new)

Plume Poppy. A 2011 collection from Guizhou, SW China, this was very attractive in seed when we found it at the side of the road; the tall branched heads covered in coral coloured seed capsules. A tall suckering perennial with very handsome grey-green well lobed foliage on glaucous bloomed stems, topped by large plumes of small white flowers.

Add quantity to shopping list: Add
1 item(s) added | View shopping list

Maianthemum racemosum 'Emily Moody' (syn. Smilacina)

Maianthemum racemosum 'Emily Moody' (syn. Smilacina)

A fine form from the States, making a slightly larger plant with bigger heads of frothy scented white flowers in spring. Equally delicious fragrance and red fruit. Easy in moist-ish leafy soil in part shade. Up to 90cm

Add quantity to shopping list: Add
1 item(s) added | View shopping list

Maianthemum stellatum

Maianthemum stellatum

A dainty Solomon's seal relative from North America with narrow leaflets on the 30-45cm stems which terminate with a cluster of starry white flowers in spring. Red berries follow in autumn. Humusy soil in part shade.

Add quantity to shopping list: Add
1 item(s) added | View shopping list

Matthiola fruticulosa 'Alba'

A perennial stock with deliciously fragrant white flowers in summer. Striking grey foliage. To 75cm. Sun, drainage.

Add quantity to shopping list: Add
1 item(s) added | View shopping list

Meconopsis x sheldonii

Meconopsis x sheldonii

A very fine, reliably perennial, big blue poppy. Large rich-blue flowers in May. Moist, humus-rich soil in part shade, unless you live in the cool, rainy north, where you can grow it in full sun. Height 90cm.

Add quantity to shopping list: Add
1 item(s) added | View shopping list

Melianthus comosus (new)

One of the hardiest Melianthus species, being generally found in the drier inland areas of South Africa, though perfectly amenable to cultivation in the UK, if not too desperately cold. The grey pinnate heavily serrated foliage is smaller than that of M. major and hairy. Clusters of red flowers with black nectar in summer, followed by inflated pods. Sun and well drained soil. 1.8m.

Add quantity to shopping list: Add
1 item(s) added | View shopping list

Molopospermum peloponnesiacum

An exceptional umbel from the mountains of central and southern Europe. Fairly large, glossy green, deeply and strikingly dissected ferny foliage emerges in early spring, followed by yellowish-white umbels of fragrant flowers on stems to 1.3m high in early summer. The seedheads are themselves attractive, bearing yellow seeds. For sun or semi-shade.

Add quantity to shopping list: Add
1 item(s) added | View shopping list

Monarda 'Raspberry Wine'

A fine mildew resistant form with rich red-pink flowers over dark green highly aromatic foliage. Forms big clumps to 1.2m tall. The flowers are a magnet for butterflies. For any reasonable soil, not too bone dry in summer. Hardy, for sun or semi-shade.

Add quantity to shopping list: Add
1 item(s) added | View shopping list

Mukdenia acanthifolia

A perfect example of weird naming, the leaves are the opposite shape to any Acanthus I know. With rounded, unlobed leaves this is quite distinct from M. rossii the only other species. Similar branched inflorescences of white saxifrage flowers rise to 40cm above the bright-green new foliage in spring, the latter turning to a butter colour in autumn. Semi-shade and humusy soil. Hardy.

Add quantity to shopping list: Add
1 item(s) added | View shopping list

Mukdenia rossii 'Karasuba'

A selected form with the green palmate leaves turning red from the tips in late summer.. White saxifragaceous flowers in spring. Height 25cm. For a woodsy site in light shade. but if not too dry the colour is more pronounced with more sun

Add quantity to shopping list: Add
1 item(s) added | View shopping list

Displaying 1 to 10 of 10 results, sorted alphabetically.
Click on any thumbnails to see a larger picture:

^ Back to top..